Cat’s Cradle


Updated at 1/27/2016 03:45:16 - Details
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Xandy24 Cat's Cradle, by Kurt Vonnegut, is a story based on accounts of what certain interested Americans were doing at the precise moment the atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima. Through correspondence with the three children of Felix Hoenikker, Nobel Prize winner and so-called ''father of the atomic bomb,'' he emits a portrait of the man in relation to his family and the community. The characters in Cat's Cradle represent Vonnegut's pacifist view, each possessing a different perspective but all seeking the sensation of power. The characters portray humankind, by revealing their different views on controversial subjects that are all wrapped around the main controversy at the time, atomic weapons. This work of fiction displays Vonnegut's satirical style of writing. Cat's Cradle is an irreverent and highly entertaining fantasy concerning the playful irresponsibility of nuclear scientists. I recommend this book to all readers that seek a entertaining "black humorist" novel that will always have your brain turning gears.

Anonymous Kurt Vonneguts Cats Cradle is written as a memoir by Jonah, a writer who is gathering information and doing research for his book about a man named Dr. Felix Hoenikker, one of the guys involved with creating the atomic bomb, and the day the bomb was dropped on Hiroshima. Dr. Hoenikker died so Jonah tracks down the doctors co-workers and three adult children. Jonahs quest comes to an end as he and Hoenikkers children converge on the remote island of San Lorenzo where through a simple, but unusual series of events, the world as we know it ends. And yet there is much more emblazoned on the pages of Cats Cradle. Although the novel is less that two hundred pages, the book deals with issues of nationalism, religion, and interpersonal relationships. Cats Cradle, written during the time of the Cold War and shortly after World War II, deals with some major issues of the time in a clever, satirical sort of way. It also talks about how humans form meaningless and illogical bonds with people based on irrelevant similarities. For instance, one character assumes that a person is automatically a wholesome person worthy of trust and loyalty solely because that person is from her hometown. Another amusing as well as interesting aspect about Vonneguts novel is that he created his own fictional religion called Bokononism just for the purpose of the book. Bokononism has its own jargon as well as its own philosophies. Bokononism illustrates Vonneguts view that religion is a hindrance something that satisfies our confusion instead of promoting understanding and enlightenment. Cats Cradle is certainly a book that will grab at your attention with its satirical style and thought-provoking ideas. It is short and makes for a nice read. If you have not read Cats Cradle, it is a must-read for any avid reader that youll be sure to enjoy.

FocoProject I needed to get out of the funk that Chuck Palahniuk had put me into with his books. This time I headed for the classics instead of a contemporary, and Kurts `Cats Cradle had come up conference.Written by the author of `Slaughter House Five and `The Sirens of Titan, `Cats Cradle is considered one of his best works and what a work it is. As it turns out it is Apocalyptic as well, which is not exactly the direction that I had hoped to go in, but at that point I was already well into the book and enjoying it thoroughly.The story is narrated by a reporter, who had once wanted to write a book about the bomb (Hiroshima, Nagasaki), or more exactly a collection of stories about famous people, intellectuals and celebrities, and what they were doing the day the bomb dropped. One of the people he had wanted to interview was a scientist who had been dubbed the `father of the bomb. By now, the narrator has converted to a strange religion made up by a Calypso singer in the Island of San Lorenzo. Giving up on his dream to write to book, the main character ends up being sent to San Lorenzo to write a profile, and his karass (according to his religion a group of people interconected in life) ends up coming together in the island, where they come to witness one of the strangest events man kind would ever come to see.This book is great and magnificently written, filled with satirical humor that actually had me putting the book down to laugh out loud. I am not talking about a little chuckle before I continue on. I am talking about honest to goodness laughter, and the thing is, its all situational humor, so its not like I can sit here and tell you one of the jokes. You simply have to read it in context. But take it from me, this stuff is great. I will definitely be picking up another of his books soon.

Anonymous I needed to get out of the funk that Chuck Palahniuk had put me into with his books. This time I headed for the classics instead of a contemporary, and Kurts `Cats Cradle had come up conference.Written by the author of `Slaughter House Five and `The Sirens of Titan, `Cats Cradle is considered one of his best works and what a work it is. As it turns out it is Apocalyptic as well, which is not exactly the direction that I had hoped to go in, but at that point I was already well into the book and enjoying it thoroughly.The story is narrated by a reporter, who had once wanted to write a book about the bomb (Hiroshima, Nagasaki), or more exactly a collection of stories about famous people, intellectuals and celebrities, and what they were doing the day the bomb dropped. One of the people he had wanted to interview was a scientist who had been dubbed the `father of the bomb. By now, the narrator has converted to a strange religion made up by a Calypso singer in the Island of San Lorenzo. Giving up on his dream to write to book, the main character ends up being sent to San Lorenzo to write a profile, and his karass (according to his religion a group of people interconected in life) ends up coming together in the island, where they come to witness one of the strangest events man kind would ever come to see.This book is great and magnificently written, filled with satirical humor that actually had me putting the book down to laugh out loud. I am not talking about a little chuckle before I continue on. I am talking about honest to goodness laughter, and the thing is, its all situational humor, so its not like I can sit here and tell you one of the jokes. You simply have to read it in context. But take it from me, this stuff is great. I will definitely be picking up another of his books soon.

Anonymous The message in Kurt Vonnegut's novel, Cat's Cradle, is the result of a fusion between insanity and morality. Concisely, Cat's Cradle is the tale of a writer, a scientist, a religious leader, a midget, and a clarinet player that takes the reader on a madcap adventure leading up to the end of the world. In this work, Vonnegut comments on religion, relationships, philosophy, and the woes of scientific discovery. Although the book had redeeming moments, I did not particularly enjoy reading it. From start to finish, the book leaves the reader with a certain amount of uncertainty about what lies in the future, and a certain level of confusion about what was communicated in the past. Even the last paragraph of the novel leaves the reader grasping for answers. This is not to say the book was always vague and un-gratifying. The book succeeds at keeping the reader thinking, even asking themselves questions about philosophy. In addition, some of the anecdotes in Cat's Cradle 'fictional though they may be' were entertaining. Having read, and enjoyed, Slaughterhouse V, I have concluded that half of the battle to appreciating Vonnegut's work is to go into the novel expecting a great work. The other half is wrenching yourself away from what Vonnegut writes, and diverting your focus to what Vonnegut means.

bookwormm At a quick glance, Kurt Vonnegut's Cat's Cradle seemed to be a short novel with nothing else special but the author's distinctive sarcastic tone. The book proved to be more than that. It is a cleverly written satire of men's stupidity and the consequences of it-- in this particular case, the end of the world.

The protagonist, when doing research about the day "Little Boy" was dropped in Hiroshima, learns about one of the fathers of the atomic bomb: a Nobel prize-winning physicist called Felix Hoenikker. While investigating the eccentric scientist, he encounters various unique characters and by means of what only could be explained as destiny, ends up fleeting to a fantasy-like island. It is there where he will fall in love, convert into the fictitious and illegal religion of Bokononism, and be witness of how the careless use of a dangerous substance known as "ice-nine" can change life as we know it; all in a matter of days.

In three hundred pages, Vonnegut manages to make us laugh out loud with characters and situations that he has cunningly crafted to mock humanity and remember us how far from perfect we are. Full of guile and irony, Cat's Cradle is a smart, yet easy-to-read masterpiece that should be included in every reader's shelves.

DeDeFlowers This is the second book I have read by Vonnegut. The first being Slaughterhouse Five, which I was luke-warm for. I have to say that Cat's Cradle really impressed me. I loved the story. It kept up a nice pace and was easy to follow. Kurt's writing style is super fast to read and the many, many chapters also broke up the book in a pleasing way. I was thoroughly entertained during every page of this book. During the time it was written I would imagine it being very 'gutsy' a subject to write about and it stands the test of time. It mocks religion in such a true, but not annoying way. I absolutely loved it. It had a really great ending as well. I don't give out five stars too often but this book definitely called for it!

As for the books I am recommending, because I have only read one of his (Vonnegut's) other books I will mention how much Chuck Palahniuk writes like Vonnegut. They are very similar and I think if you enjoy one you will enjoy the other.

A+ for Cat's Cradle.

Anonymous I feel so mortified that I did not like this book. I love Kurt Vonnegut. but this book had more potential. I wanted more backround information for his main character, if any. I mean he cant just shove me into a story, nay, a world that has no clear explanation at all. I wasnt sure if they were in the future or what the heck San Lorenzo was supposed to be. I really liked the whole Ice Nine part of the story. but besides that I was just disinterested and confused. this is nothing against Kurt Vonnegut at all I love the man he is amazing, a genius I am sure. but he just needed to give me a little more info to be able to acutally care about these characters. It could just not measure up to Slaughter House

Anonymous This book was recommended to me by a friend, and I really did enjoy it. The basic plotline follows John and his quest for information for his book on the atomic bomb, which leads him to discover Bokononism- a religion that admits that it's a bunch of lies. John experiences the danger of human stupidity coupled with technology. I've read many of Vonnegut's works, and I enjoyed this one the most so far because of the easy-to-follow plot line and developed characters. You can either read this book for enjoyment or for depth and moral debate; either way it would not be a waste of time to check it out.

Anonymous I have never read a book that caused me to cry and laugh simultaneously when I finished it. I think this amazing book works on two different levels. First, there is the obvious humor of the plot every single character in this apocalyptic scenario is mental. However, on another level, the irony runs deep. It is one of those truthful books that is compelling and profound enough to make you shiver. I suppose this does not exactly tell you why to read the book, but I can assure you that Vonnegut's words speak for themselves. Just trust me: Read Cat's Cradle you will not regret it.



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